Consanguineous Minds

A blog of endless curiosity

Small Free Kiss in the Dark (CBCA Shortlisted)

A Small Free Kiss in the Dark – Glenda Millard

Last night I started A Small Free Kiss in the Dark and was blown away. This is the teen equivalent of a mash-up of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road and Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time. And I don’t mean this to demean the book’s originality at all, because its evocation of homelessness in a bustling city which soon turns to mass homelessness in a war-torn city, is brilliantly done to evoke the reader’s own city. Skip is a slightly aspergian kid who’s moved from foster home to foster home after the death of his war veteran father. At the beginning of the book he is making his escape from school and a family that is not a family, to the city. He has nothing but his father’s old overcoat, his colorful view of the world through art, and his own talented artistry to help him out. Once there he meets Billy, a homeless, funny and kindhearted man, who helps Skip buy chalk to make murals on the cement around libraries and churches. For me, this evoked the Eternity Man, Arthur Stace who gave hope through his graffiti medium in post WWII Sydney. When war suddenly hits the city, Skip is sleeping in a dumpster, and can’t find his friend Billy. What ensues is an account of utter chaos, which, through the eyes of Skip can sometimes seem eerily beautiful.

“Behind me, a building erupted like a volcano, spewing red hot lava onto the streets. I turned to run and saw the church spire of St Mary’s, only it wasn’t where it used to be…The bells had buried themselves in concrete, and if you didn’t know anything about concrete, you’d think it was soft as butter.”

Skip’s sometimes halting, imagery-filled, sometimes quick-changing narration is very readable, and his character is beautifully drawn through the words he uses, and the often abstract ideas that he has. Although these ideas are not often realistic, they contain, almost without him realizing it, a lot of hope for the future.

I’m very much looking forward to finishing the book. I think Millard’s done a wonderful job and that this will make a very engaging and thought provoking book for young adults and late teens.

For the rest of the CBCA shortlist see here

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This entry was posted on June 8, 2010 by in Uncategorized.
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